KindWeb

Connect with KindWeb on Facebook
Connect with KindWeb on Twitter
   Welcome KindFolks!
News Home  •   Featured  •  Music  •  Environmental  •  Political  •  Odd  •  Other
Environmental News Article Results
3161 articles found
How Can Making 3 000 Tons of Ice Every Night Actually End Up Saving Energy How Can Making 3 000 Tons of Ice Every Night Actually End Up Saving Energy
[ Jul 29, 2011 - Share ]
Once again the United States is experiencing record hot temperatures this summer, which means that electric grids are working harder than ever to provide the energy needed to keep commercial buildings and their employees cool. And, as businesses try to keep costs down the increased use of air conditioners continues to be a drain on the bottom line.
Solar EV Chargers Make Zero Emissions a Reality Solar EV Chargers Make Zero Emissions a Reality
[ Jul 29, 2011 - Share ]
"Zero emissions" is a tricky phrase. Electric vehicles produce zero emissions at the tailpipe, but more often than not there are emissions at the power plant. The only way to have a truly zero-emissions EV is to get your power from a renewable source like the sun.
Union Pacific train carrying hazardous materials derails in California Union Pacific train carrying hazardous materials derails in California
[ Jul 29, 2011 - Share ]
A Union Pacific freight train carrying more than 60 cars, some loaded with hazardous substances, derailed on Friday in a desert town north of Los Angeles, prompting evacuations of nearby homes, fire officials said.
Tree Rings Affected by More than Just Climate Tree Rings Affected by More than Just Climate
[ Jul 29, 2011 - Share ]
To this point, tree rings have been amazingly useful for gathering information on past climates. A two hundred year old tree can carry a world of information in its rings. In temperate regions, where seasons differ greatly, each ring denotes one year of growing. For longer growing seasons, the rings are wider. For shorter growing seasons, they are narrower
Study: Height Plays a Factor in Cancer Risk for Women Study: Height Plays a Factor in Cancer Risk for Women
[ Jul 22, 2011 - Share ]
The risk of contracting cancer is generally thought to be caused by a combination of lifestyle and inheritance. If you decide to smoke too much, drink too much, or eat too much, the risk of cancer goes up. Plus, if your ancestors had a heightened risk of cancer, chances are you contain similar genetics. Now, new research from the University of Oxford has put forward a new theory: taller women are at increased risk of a wide range of cancer
Man-Eating Lions Attack by the Dark of the Moon Man-Eating Lions Attack by the Dark of the Moon
[ Jul 22, 2011 - Share ]
If you want to avoid becoming a lion's dinner, keep an eye on the moon. A new study reveals that the big cats are most likely to attack people during the 10 days following the full moon. That's when it's darkest during the hours that humans are out and about at night—and when lions are at their hungriest
Why Grass Fed Beef Isn't Just Healthier Why Grass Fed Beef Isn't Just Healthier
[ Jul 22, 2011 - Share ]
Organic produce and pasture based meat and dairy have less of an environmental impact than their conventionally produced counterparts, a recently released report by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found. Titled A Meat Eater's Guide to Climate Change and Health, the report includes lifecycle assessments of 20 popular types of meat, dairy and vegetable proteins
US Shale Gas and the World Energy Power Balance US Shale Gas and the World Energy Power Balance
[ Jul 22, 2011 - Share ]
Rising U.S. natural gas production from shale formations has already played a critical role in weakening Russia's ability to wield an "energy weapon" over its European customers, and this trend will accelerate in the coming decades, according to a new Baker Institute study, "Shale Gas and U.S. National Security."
Pollutants Can Lurk and Hide Pollutants Can Lurk and Hide
[ Jul 22, 2011 - Share ]
The health implications of polluting the environment weigh increasingly on our public consciousness, and pharmaceutical wastes continue to be a main culprit. Now a Tel Aviv University researcher says that current testing for these dangerous contaminants isn't going far enough
Giant  Toxic Weed Poses Health Risk Giant Toxic Weed Poses Health Risk
[ Jul 22, 2011 - Share ]
It's exotic and beautiful, a 15-foot tall plant with clusters of dainty white flowers and human-sized leaves -- resembling, it is often said, Queen Anne's Lace on steroids
Power Generation from Renewables Surpasses Nuclear Power Generation from Renewables Surpasses Nuclear
[ Jul 11, 2011 - Share ]
The latest issue of the Monthly Energy Review published by the US Energy Information Administration, electric power generation from renewable sources has surpassed production from nuclear sources, and is now "closing in on oil," says Ken Bossong Executive Director of the Sun Day Campaign
Africa drought endangers 500 000 children Africa drought endangers 500 000 children
[ Jul 11, 2011 - Share ]
The lives of half a million children in the Horn of Africa are at risk, international aid agencies said on Friday, as the worst drought in decades forces thousands of people to flee their homes each day.
Yellowstone River water not toxic from spill  according to EPA Yellowstone River water not toxic from spill according to EPA
[ Jul 11, 2011 - Share ]
Water downstream from a ruptured Exxon Mobil pipeline that leaked oil into the Yellowstone River showed no detectable levels of toxic petroleum chemicals, according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency documents released on Saturday
Holes in Dinosaurs Holes in Dinosaurs
[ Jul 11, 2011 - Share ]
Dinosaurs are a diverse group of animals that were the dominant terrestrial vertebrates for over 160 million years, from the late Triassic period (about 230 million years ago) until the end of the Cretaceous (about 65 million years ago), when the Cretaceous—Paleogene extinction event led to the extinction of most dinosaur species at the close of the Mesozoic era. New research from the University of Adelaide has added to the debate about whether dinosaurs were cold-blooded and sluggish or warm-blooded and active
Disaster relief seeds 'should be more diverse' Disaster relief seeds 'should be more diverse'
[ Jul 11, 2011 - Share ]
[NAIROBI] African farmers who lose their seeds in floods and droughts could restore their crop biodiversity quicker by trading local seed varieties at markets and through informal social links than by receiving seeds from aid agencies, a study suggests. The genetic diversity of crops allows plant populations to adapt to changing environments and provides the raw materials for crop improvement programmes. It is crucial for ensuring food security through the traditional African cropping system.
Page:  Previous  1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10  Next
Recent News  
Trey Anastasio 'The Beacon Jams' Night 8: Setlist amp; Recap 
  11/28/2020
Time for Kindness 
  11/16/2020
Phish Announce Costume Set Triple-Header for Halloween 'Dinner And A Movie' Broadcast 
  10/23/2020
Pro-Shot Video: Trey Anastasio Shares Footage of quot;Divided Sky quot; from The Beacon Jams 
  10/23/2020
Phil Lesh Schedules Phil's Choice Phriday Outdoor Show in San Rafael 
  10/22/2020
Music • Environmental • Political • Odd • Other

Recent Reviews  
Various Artists - 20 x 20: The LVF Singer/Songwriter Compilation
Umphreys McGee - 4/26/2017: Jannus Landing, St Petersburg FL
The Infamous Stringdusters - 3/17/2017: Park West; Chicago, Ill
Yonder Mountain String Band and G. Love & Special Sauce - 2/17/2017: Stubb's, Austin, TX
The Woodsheep - Watching Mars
Contact Us  •  Privacy Policy
1998 - 2020   KindWeb.com.   All Rights Reserved.